Friday, December 27, 2013

Eighteen Epic Productivity Applications?

My attention was called to this post earlier today. I did not have much hope for it, given the bombastic title. I had even less hope when I read the author's definition of "productivity" which is
The ability to get important things accomplished in a way that honors commitments in an excellent way, respects my own time and that of others, and allows my body and psyche to focus and sustain the best mental state possible for emotional, professional, and personal well being and enjoyment.
This is nothing but a bit of sanctimonious BS. Sorry, but that is how I feel. "Productivity," whatever it is, has nothing to do with "importance." And what does it mean to "honor comitments in an excellent way"? Nor does it concern "body and psyche" to "focus and sustain the best mental state," whatever that means.

"Productivity" simply means "the ratio of output to inputs in production;" it is thus "an average measure of the efficiency of production" (adopted from Wikipedia).

Given the author's "definition" of productivity, I expected little. But I got even less. Some fairly uncritical notes about applications everyone is already aware of, namely, Evernote, vJournal (or Journal), "built in Hotkeys for snippets on your iPhone / iPad / Computer"—really "epic" this one, Mailbox, Calendar 5, YouMail, Launch Center, 30/30, Drafts, Dropbox, Dragon Dictation, Audible, Get Abstract, Kindle, iCatcher, and Hootsuite for Twitter, clearly nothing but a time-waster. The mixture of desktop and iOS applications was also a bit disturbing to me. I should have known after I read the definition of "productivity."

But even after reading the whole thing, I can't see how "built in Hotkeys for snippets on your iPhone / iPad / Computer" make you accomplish "important things ... in a way that honors commitments in an excellent way" or how a twitter client allows "body and psyche to focus and sustain the best mental state possible for emotional, professional, and personal well being and enjoyment."

To end on a positive note, it may well be that someone (though I don't know who) might find this list and the discussion useful, but it isn't me (nor anyone I know).[1]


1. I should perhaps point out that I don't think that there is, per se, anything wrong with any of the applications. Even "time-wasters" have their place, but "productivity applications" they are not.

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