Monday, March 9, 2015

Why it does not Matter whether your Child Gets into Harvard

This is only tangentially related to note-taking, but there is an interesting article in the New Republic, which I cannot help but agree. There is a powerful tradition, according to which
it matters why students want to acquire knowledge in the first place. Using the mind as a means to acquire a corner office is very different from enjoying intellectual activity for its own sake. This is not a distinction irrelevant to the madness of college admissions. ... college brochures took their own rhetoric about falling in love with the life of the mind seriously, they would encourage students not to see their studies as purely instrumental. Career services programs love to boast that you can study German literature or philosophy and still get a job in consulting; but whether or not this is true misses the point.

Really, it does! See also: Exercising control over how and what you think.

2 comments:

votre said...

Since the downside for those who grew up in an environment of relative wealth and privilege is significantly less than it is for those who are already living in that downside, Ivy League and elite schools don't matter - as much.

However, the tell-tale of the privileged mindset is to scorn something the majority sees as desirable. Which is the same mindset many who tell others to "do what you love" have.

MK said...

I don`t understand your claim that "the downside for those who grew up in an environment of relative wealth and privilege is significantly less than it is for those who are already living in that downside, Ivy League and elite schools don't matter - as much." It would seem to me that exactly the opposite is true. If someone is living "on the downside" already, any university education is an "upside"—I would think. For those who live in "an environment of relative wealth and privilege" it might not be an upside at all.

Secondly, I don't "scorn" the Ivy League and elite schools. All I am saying is that education is a worth while pursuit, quite independently of whether it gets you a corner office.